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THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION 1994 Film
  • Andy Dufresne: She was beautiful. God I loved her. I just didn't know how to show it, that's all. I killed her, Red. I didn't pull the trigger, but I pushed her away. And that's why she died, because of me.

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  • Quotes
    • Andy Dufresne
      • Andy Dufresne: The silent, silent partner. He's the guilty one, your Honor. The man with the bank accounts. That's where the filtering process starts. They trace it back, all they're gonna find is him.
      • Andy Dufresne: She was beautiful. God I loved her. I just didn't know how to show it, that's all. I killed her, Red. I didn't pull the trigger, but I pushed her away. And that's why she died, because of me.
      • Andy Dufresne: What you hear isn't half of it. He's got scams you haven't dreamed of. Kickbacks on his kickbacks. There's a river of dirty money flowing through this place.
      • Andy Dufresne: Not me. I didn't shoot my wife and I didn't shoot her lover, and whatever mistakes I made I've paid for and then some. That hotel and that boat. I don't think it's too much to want. To look at the stars just after sunset. Touch the sand. Wade in the water. Feel free.
      • Andy Dufresne: Here's where it makes the most sense. You need it so you don't forget. Forget that there are places in the world that aren't made out of stone. That there's a - there's a - there's something inside that's yours, that they can't touch.
      • Andy Dufresne: Remember, Red, hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things. And no good thing ever dies.
      • Andy Dufresne: That's the beauty of music. They can't take that away from you.
      • Andy Dufresne: Dear Red. If you're reading this, you've gotten out. And if you've come this far, maybe you're willing to come a little further. You remember the name of the town, don't you? I could use a good man to help me get my project on wheels. I'll keep an eye out for you and the chessboard ready. Remember, Red. Hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things, and no good thing ever dies. I will be hoping that this letter finds you, and finds you well. Your friend. Andy.
      • Andy Dufresne: Mexico. Little place right on the Pacific. You know what the Mexicans say about the Pacific? They say it has no memory. That's where I'd like to finish out my life, Red. A warm place with no memory. Open a little hotel right on the beach. Buy some worthless old boat and fix it up like new. Take my guests out charter fishing.
      • Andy Dufresne: The funny thing is, on the outside, I was an honest man, straight as an arrow. I had to come to prison to be a crook.
      • Andy Dufresne: Mr. Hadley, do you trust your wife?
      • Andy Dufresne: My wife used to say I'm a hard man to know. Like a closed book. Complained about it all the time. She was beautiful. I loved her. But I guess I couldn't show it enough. I killed her, Red. I didn't pull the trigger. But I drove her away. That's why she died. Because of me, the way I am.
      • Andy Dufresne: Okay. But you should know that sudden serious brain injury causes the victim to bite down. Hard. In fact, I understand the bite-reflex is so strong the victim's jaws have to be pried open with a crowbar.
      • Andy Dufresne: Forget that there are places in the world that aren't made out of stone, that there's something inside that they can't get to and they can't touch. It's yours.
      • Andy Dufresne: One in particular. Got a long rock wall with a big oak at the north end. Like something out of a Robert Frost poem. It's where I asked my wife to marry me. We'd gone for a picnic. We made love under that tree. I asked and she said yes. Promise me, Red. If you ever get out, find that spot. In the base of that wall you'll find a rock that has no earthly business in a Maine hayfield. A piece of black volcanic glass. You'll find something buried under it I want you to have.
    • Bogs
      • Bogs: Now I'm gonna open my fly, and you're gonna swallow what I give you to swallow. And when you do mine, you gonna swallow Rooster's. You done broke his nose, so he ought to have somethin' to show for it.
    • Brooks Hatlen
      • Brooks Hatlen: Maybe I should rob the FoodWay so they'll send me home. I could shoot the manager while I'm at it, kind of like a bonus.
      • Brooks Hatlen: The world went and got itself in a big damn hurry.
    • Captain Hadley
      • Captain Hadley: If I hear so much as a mouse fart in here I swear by God and sonny Jesus you will all visit the infirmary. Every last motherfucker in here.
      • Captain Hadley: The government reaches inside your shirt and squeezes until your tit turns purple.
      • Captain Hadley: What is your malfunction, you fat barrel of monkey spunk?
      • Captain Hadley: Step aside Mert, this fucker's about to have himself an accident.
      • Captain Hadley: You eat when we say you eat. You shit when we say you shit. You piss when we say you piss. You got that, you maggot dick motherfucker?
    • Captain Hadley & Prisoner
      • Captain Hadley: What the Christ is this happy horse shit?
        Prisoner: Hey, he took the Lord's name in vain! I'm tellin' the warden!
        Captain Hadley: You'll be tellin' the warden about my baton up your ass!
    • Floyd
      • Floyd: I do believe you're talking out of your ass.
    • Mother
      • Mother: Anybody come at you yet? Anybody get to you yet? Hey, we all need friends in here. I could be a friend to you.
      • Mother: Now I'm gonna open my fly and you're gonna swallow what I give you to swallow.
    • Red
      • Red: Andy loved geology. I imagine it appealed to his meticulous nature. An ice age here, a million years of mountain-building there, plates of bedrock grinding against each other over a span of millennia. Geology is the study of pressure and time. That's all it takes, really. Pressure and time.
      • Red: Prison life consists of routine, and then more routine.
      • Red: Get busy living, or get busy dying. That's goddamned right.
      • Red: I could see why some of the boys took him for snobby. He had a quiet way about him, a walk and a talk that just wasn't normal around here. He strolled, like a man in a park without a care or a worry in the world, like he had on an invisible coat that would shield him from this place.
      • Red: We sat and drank with the sun on our shoulders and felt like free men. Hell, we could have been tarring the roof of one of our own houses. We were the lords of all creation.
      • Red: I find I'm so excited, I can barely sit still or hold a thought in my head. I think it the excitement only a free man can feel, a free man at the start of a long journey whose conclusion is uncertain. I hope I can make it across the border. I hope to see my friend, and shake his hand. I hope the Pacific is as blue as it has been in my dreams. I hope.
      • Red: That tall drink of water with the silver spoon up his ass.
      • Red: The first night's the toughest, no doubt about it. They march you in naked as the day you were born, skin burning and half blind from that delousing shit they throw on you, and when they put you in that cell. and those bars slam home.that's when you know it's for real. A whole life blown away in the blink of an eye. Nothing left but all the time in the world to think about it.
      • Red: I have no idea to this day what those two Italian ladies were singing about. Truth is, I don't want to know. Some things are better left unsaid. I'd like to think they were singing about something so beautiful it can't expressed in words, and it makes your heart ache because of it. I tell you, those voices soared higher and farther than anybody in a grey place dares to dream. It was as if some beautiful bird had flapped into our drab little cage and made these walls dissolve away, and for the briefest of moments, every last man in Shawshank felt free.
      • Red: Forty years I been asking permission to piss. I can't squeeze a drop without say-so.
      • Red: I like to think the last thing that went through his head other than that bullet, was how the hell that Andy Dufrense got the best of him.
      • Red: Thirty years I've been asking permission to piss. I can't squeeze a drop without say-so. Women, too, that's the other thing. I forgot they were half the human race. There's women everywhere, every shape and size. I find myself semi-hard most of the time, cursing myself for a dirty old man. Not a brassiere to be seen, nipples poking out at the world. Jeezus, pleeze-us. Back in my day, a woman out in public like that would have been arrested and given a sanity hearing.
      • Red: There's a con like me in every prison in America, I guess. I'm the guy who can get it for you. Cigarettes, a bag of reefer if you're partial, a bottle of brandy to celebrate your kid's high school graduation. Damn near anything, within reason.
      • Red: I love when she does that shit with her hair.
      • Red: These walls are kind of funny. First you hate 'em, then you get used to 'em. Enough time passes, gets so you depend on them. That's institutionalized. They send you here for life, that's exactly what they take. The part that counts, anyways.
      • Red: I find I am so excited I can barely sit still or hold a thought in my head. I think it is the excitement only a free man can feel, a free man at the start of a long journey whose conclusion is uncertain. I hope I can make it across the border. I hope to see my friend and shake his hand. I hope the Pacific is as blue as it has been in my dreams. I hope.
      • Red: I wish I could tell you that Andy fought the good fight, and the Sisters let him be. I wish I could tell you that, but prison is no fairy-tale world. He never said who did it. But we all knew. Things went on like that for a while. Prison life consists of routine, and then more routine. Every so often, Andy would show up with fresh bruises. The Sisters kept at him. Sometimes he was able to fight them off. Sometimes not. He always fought, that's what I remember. He fought because he knew if he didn't fight, it would make it that much easier not to fight the next time. Half the time it landed him in the infirmary. The other half, it landed him in solitary. Warden Norton's "grain & drain" vacation. Bread, water, and all the privacy you could want.
      • Red: The first night's the toughest, no doubt about it. They march you in naked as the day you're born, fresh from a Bible reading, skin burning and half-blind from that delousing shit they throw on you. and when they put you in that cell, when those bars slam home, that's when you know it's for real. Old life blown away in the blink of an eye. a long cold season in hell stretching out ahead.nothing left but all the time in the world to think about it. Most new fish come close to madness the first night. Somebody always breaks down crying. Happens every time. The only question is, who's it gonna be?
      • Red: Let me tell you something my friend. Hope is a dangerous thing. Hope can drive a man insane.
      • Red: But there are times I curse him for the dreams he left behind. dreams where I am lost in a warm place with no memory. An ocean so big it strikes me dumb. Waves so quiet they strike me deaf. Sunshine so bright it strikes me blind. It is a place that is blue beyond reason. Bluer than can possibly exist. Bluer than my mind can possibly grasp. I am terrified. There is no way home.
      • Red: Two things never happened again after that. The Sisters never laid a finger on Andy again. and Bogs never walked again. They transferred him to a minimum security hospital upstate. To my knowledge, he lived out the rest of his days drinking his food through a straw.
      • Red: And that's how it came to pass, that on the second-to-last day of the job, the convict crew that tarred the plate factory roof in the spring of '49. wound up sitting in a row at ten o'clock in the morning, drinking icy cold Black Label beer courtesy of the hardest screw that ever walked a turn at Shawshank State Prison. The colossal prick even managed to sound magnanimous. We sat and drank with the sun on our shoulders, and felt like free men. We could'a been tarring the roof of one of our own houses. We were the Lords of all Creation. As for Andy, he spent that break hunkered in the shade, a strange little smile on his face, watching us drink his beer.
      • Red: Man's been here fifty years. This place is all he knows. In here, he's an important man, an educated man. A librarian. Out there, he's nothing but a used-up old con with arthritis in both hands. Couldn't even get a library card if he applied. You see what I'm saying?
      • Red: I have no idea to this day what those two Italian ladies were singing about. Truth is, I don't want to know. Some things are better left unsaid. I'd like to think they were singing about something so beautiful it can't expressed in words, and it makes your heart ache because of it. I tell you, those voices soared higher and farther than anybody in a grey place dares to dream. It was as if some beautiful bird had flapped into our drab little cage and made these walls dissolve away, and for the briefest of moments, every last man in Shawshank felt free.
      • Red: Andy Dufresne, who crawled through a river of shit and came out clean on the other side. Andy Dufresne, headed for the Pacific. Those of us who knew him best talk about him often. I swear, the stuff he pulled... Sometimes it makes me sad, though, Andy being gone. I have to remind myself that some birds aren't meant to be caged. Their feathers are just too bright and when they fly away, the part of you that knows it was a sin to lock them up does rejoice, but still, the place you live in is that much more drab and empty now that they're gone. I guess I just miss my friend.
      • Red: In 1966, Andy Dufresne escaped from Shawshank prison. All they found of him was a muddy set of prison clothes, a bar of soap, and an old rock hammer, damn near worn down to the nub. I remember thinking it would take a man six hundred years to tunnel through the wall with it. Old Andy did it in less than twenty.
    • Red & Parole Official
      • Red: What do you really want to know? Am I sorry for what I did?
        Parole official: Well, are you?
        Red: There's not a day goes by I don't feel regret. Not because I'm in here, or because you think I should. I look back on the way I was then then, a young, stupid kid who committed that terrible crime. I want to talk to him. I want to try and talk some sense to him, tell him the way things are. But I can't. That kid's long gone and this old man is all that's left. I got to live with that. Rehabilitated? It's just a bullshit word. So you go on and stamp your form, sonny, and stop wasting my time. Because to tell you the truth, I don't give a shit.
      • Red: Rehabilitated? Now let me see. You know, I don't have any idea what that means.
        Parole official: Well, it means that you're ready to rejoin society.
        Red: I know what you think it means, sonny. To me it's just a made up word; a politician's word. So young fellas like yourself can wear a suit, and tie, and have a job."
    • Warden Samuel Norton
      • Warden Samuel Norton: He vanished like a fart in the wind.
      • Warden Samuel Norton: I believe in two things: discipline and the Bible. Here you'll receive both. Put your trust in the Lord; your ass belongs to me. Welcome to Shawshank.
      • Warden Samuel Norton: Salvation lies within.
      • Warden Samuel Norton: This is Mr. Hadley, captain of the guard. I am Mr. Norton, the warden. You are sinners and scum, that's why they sent you to me. Rule number one: no blaspheming. I'll not have the Lord's name taken in vain in my prison. The other rules you'll figure out as you go along. Any questions?. I believe in two things. Discipline and the Bible. Here, you'll receive both. Put your faith in the Lord. Your ass belongs to me. Welcome to Shawshank.

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